Returning Riders Blamed for Increased Motorcycle Fatalities

The Associated Press reports that the number of motorcycle fatalities occuring in the State of Maine reached new heights in 2004. Twenty-t...

The Associated Press reports that the number of motorcycle fatalities occuring in the State of Maine reached new heights in 2004. Twenty-two deaths occured in the Pine Tree State last year, with 14 of those 22 to persons 35 years of age or older.

Even though the number of motorcycle registrations has increased by 31% during 1999 through 2003, the issue is not just numbers. The article cites a growing trend of baby-boomers riding bigger motorcycles. Not so much that the bigger motorcycles are more dangerous, but that the riders are not experienced enough. Many older riders rode motorcycles in their youth, but gave it up. Then later on in life, they buy a motorcycle again, but opt for a big bike:

"People have had licenses and haven’t ridden in 10 or 20 years. All of a sudden, they buy a big Harley. They’ve got to learn how to drive it," Hallman said.

"I’ve seen a lot of people getting back into the sport. They say, ‘I used to ride 20 to 25 years ago. I’m having a mid-life (crisis). I want to get back into it,"’ said Ireland, who offered instruction to 200 riders in 2004.
The article goes on to suggest that returning riders ought to be forced to take riding courses all over again.

However, in the February 2005 issue of Motorcycle Cruiser magazine, Art Friedman wrote an article entitled, "You Took a Rider Training Course. So What?", where he writes:

There is one little problem no one has talked about, however. Research shows those basic rider training courses don't have much effect. The only measured difference between training course graduates and those who start riding without any formal training shows up during the first six months, when those who take the course suffer somewhat fewer lapses - events such as crashes and tickets - than unschooled riders.
So while more motorcycle fatalities are happening to older riders, I question whether the fatalities had anything to do with knowledge of safe riding, as opposed to people doing stupid things.

The Associated Press article also didn't explain who was at fault for those fatalities, or how those fatalities occurred. Instead it only suggested that more inexperienced people are riding motorcycles, hence, more people are dying.

Related

Motorcycle Statistics 110476701794224130

Post a Comment

Follow Us

Sponsor

Latest News

Sponsor

Hot This Week

Sponsor

item