Skin Industries Under Fire From Veterans

Skin Industries, which produces clothes and designs marketed to teenagers and young adults, has come under criticism from bikers and militar...

Skin Industries, which produces clothes and designs marketed to teenagers and young adults, has come under criticism from bikers and military veterans after unveiling a design based on the POW/MIA emblem:

POW MIA emblemSkin Industries design
POW/MIA EmblemSkin Industries Design


Bikers and veterans across the United States are writing letters to Al Borda, the President of Skin Industries to complain. In response, Borda wrote a letter attempting to explain their position about the use of the POW/MIA emblem. Below are excerpts from his letter:
"...but first let inform you, the "FLAG" and or "Symbol" is not a registered trademark and is not a copyright."

"I'm sorry you feel that the design contained on one of our shirts is offensive. As President of Skin, I can assure you that it was not, and is not, our intention to offend those who have served in the military or members of their family. Skin has thousands of customers on active duty in all branches of our country's armed forces and regularly receives both requests for merchandise and notes of appreciation from those stationed overseas. We have offered a fifty percent discount on merchandise to military personnel and have been supporting our nation's troops long before it was fashionable to do so."

"Support for our troops and our nation's veterans remains extremely important to me on a personal level. Both my father and my stepfather served in the Air Force. My stepfather completed two tours of duty in Korea and three in Vietnam. In fact, the first five years of my life were spent living on military bases overseas."
Well, my father did time in Vietnam, as did my stepfather, and my father-in-law did time in Korea. And just like Mr. Borda, I lived on military bases also. I would never use such an emotional symbol as the POW/MIA emblem, disfigure it into something humorous or sexy, and try to make a buck off of it.

My guess is that Borda doesn't really design clothes and logos anymore. I'm sure he has a staff of people who do this stuff for him. To see him trying to defend this design by citing it as public domain, and then going on to say how sensitive he is about our veterans is bunch of bull shit.

If Borda does have such high regard for our fallen and forgotten servicemen, then he would have instead jumped all over this, and rolled some heads in his company. Instead, he feels that this sexy logo will generate some publicity for him.

Let's see if we can make all that publicity negative!

Here are some e-mail addresses I pulled off of their website:

Information & Customer Service: info@skinindustries.com
Marketing, Foreign Distributors: alborda@skinindustries.com
Wholesale and Dealer sales: nicole@skinindustries.com

Let them know you don't like this new design they created.

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Post a Comment

  1. Just sent this to Skin Industries...
    I know the POW/MIA flag isn't protected by copyright so there's no legal recourse to prevent you from marketing your "parody." But guys, you really shouldn't take a dump on the same people who took an ass kickin' to preserve your freedom of speech. Man oh man, that is really some shit. I've done a bunch of work with WWII & Korean War ex-POWs and I sincerely hope none of them catch sight of some clueless asshole wearing that shirt of yours. Talk about a slap in the face. I will never, and I mean ever, buy another one of your products.
    - Doc
    Riverside, CA

    ReplyDelete
  2. I just sent this to the listed email addresses:

    As a Vietnam veteran, I am disappointed in your decision to use the POW Logo as a model for your clothes. Mr. Borda's response that it is not copyrighted shows he is totally insensitive to the issue. Then to site all of his family who served in the military was pointless. Who among us does not have many friends and family who have served. I sincerely hope that you reconsider your stance on this and discontinue its use just to make a buck.

    Bob Ford
    Vietnam Veteran
    USN 1970-1974

    ReplyDelete
  3. Someone smart said "There is no bad publicity" and it is ironic that all this outrage will only drive his sales through the roof.

    Where are the feminists on this one? I mean talk about a unattainable stylized depiction of a woman . . . Is this where I list the members of my family who are in the Armed Forces?

    ReplyDelete
  4. An update on this issue. Al Borda wrote a letter to several people who have been e-mailing complaints. He states that he has removed all clothing with this logo on it, and is donating the profits from this to an organization called, "AMERICAN GOLD STARS MOTHERS, INC."

    Borda also went on to say that he chose today as the day to remove the logo because its the anniversary of the End of the Vietnam War. (whatever!!)

    I checked the Skin Industries website, and sure enough I no longer see any items for sale carrying that logo.

    Thanks to everyone who complained to Borda about this.

    Thanks also to Russ, who runs BikerCrap.com, a website that sells biker gear. Russ has been pestering Borda quite frequently on this issue.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am a rider and Vietnam vet who has always hated that 60's era, whiny, defeatest, POW-MIA logo. Jane Fonda could have come up with a better design. Good on Skins for sending it up. Maybe this will inspire someone to design a POW emblem that displays the courage, bravery and defiance that embody the American soldier.

    ReplyDelete
  6. am a rider and Vietnam vet who has always hated that 60's era, whiny, defeatest, POW-MIA logo. Jane Fonda could have come up with a better design.

    Well I am a rider too, and I did 2 tours of Vietnam. Tht logo ymbolizes our want and need to find all those lost soldiers that "we" left behind. I have that logo on every bike I ride. For you to call it whiny just shows me that you were never there or at best safe and secure in an air conditioned office waiting on some pencil neck's call for coffee.

    I'd bet you voted for Hanoi John Kerry as well.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A fellow Vietnam Vet alerted me to this piece of trash Skin patch. I was captured in Vietnam and know what it feels like to be a POW. If I see one of these patches on someone I will give the person one of two choices...cut it off....or I will cut it off.....Eagle who Cries

    ReplyDelete
  8. As a Vietnam veteran and having friends that suffered in prisoner of war camps, I find your rip-off design distasteful at the least and very unpatriotic. It disgusts me for you to use a design so sensitive to military personnel that willingly give their lives for your freedom. This brings a whole new meaning to money-grubbing and I can only hope that somewhere, somehow, you are paid in full for this low-life slap in the face.

    --Cropduster

    ReplyDelete
  9. Your logo discusses me.
    I will never buy any of your products.
    You are tasteless.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm a vet and I think it's a fine patch design. Some get offended but the ones that do always get offended at anything anyway.

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  11. You people take an honorable flag/symbol and turn it into and object of sex! Shame on you! Men died and were in captivity which this commemorates. You people are filthy! I stuffed body bags with tears in my eyes and one man died in my arms. Hell is hot and there must be a special place for you.

    Dave
    Corpus Christi

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am a veteran. Personally I like the clothing emblem of Skin Industries.

    ReplyDelete
  13. i'm not a vet but i am a big supporter of vets. I was sent an email about this from the Vietnam Vets MC and wrote a letter to skin indus. about how wrong they were and how many people they've upset. i was VERY happy to learn they've stopped production of that shirt.

    ReplyDelete
  14. With all do respect to all Veterans!!!!. Woo Woo!!!stop you're bitching and stop cryig!!, so you're symbol was changed a little to capture the minds of young people,! that really doesn't mean that we are going to forget what u guys did for us. Personally i think their are more important things to argue about then that skin symbol that rocks!!, so please zipp it suck it up and just move along!!! even if u succeed in removing the symbol from the market or not you're still be the veterans who fought for all of our freedom, so go buy you're self's a skin shirt and wear it with pride, cuzz no matter what u do someone else later on will come along and change you're pretty little symbol again.!!U just can't win them all!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Why Are you guy making a big deal of this? I wear skin clothing and I would wear this shirt...I suport our troops but just because someone made a shirt like this you have to get but hurt aboutit. Isn't there other things to worry about becides this??????

    ReplyDelete
  16. To the guy above, who can't spell... No one is butthurt. We're disgusted! This is a symbol of courage and heroism. It signifies the ultimate sacrifice. These brave soldiers gave all, so that you can sleep safe in your bed at night. Now their memory is being objectified for the sake of fashion, or "looking cool". Don't disrespect our heroes. God Bless America! My deepest thanks and admiration for all who have served(and will serve). You are not forgotten.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I am not a veteran, but I did see the movie "Platoon" 13 times and I think that entitles me to an opinion. Yes, there are the professional haters who will deliberately find any reason to find themselves offended and in the absence of that, will manufacture it like police 'manufacture' damning evidence.

    ReplyDelete
  18. this place is awsome i now know y u guys like this so much

    ReplyDelete

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